Schedule

The ACCP Updates in Therapeutics®: Pharmacotherapy Preparatory Review and Recertification Course will be held Saturday and Sunday, April 27-28, 2019.

Click below for the full meeting schedule.

Updates in Therapeutics® 2019 Preparatory
Review and Recertification Courses
April 27-28, 2019


Pharmacotherapy Preparatory Review and Recertification Course -- Biostatistics: A Refresher, Study Designs: Fundamentals, Interpretation, and Research Topics, Geriatrics, and Nephrology

Saturday, April 27, 2019 from 8:00 AM to 12:30 PM CDT at Academic and Research Building: First and Second Floors, Auditorium

Available for 3.50 hours of CPE credit
Activity Number: 0217-0000-19-073-L01-P

Biostatistics: A Refresher
8:00 AM to 9:15 AM
Academic and Research Building: First and Second Floors, Auditorium

Speakers
Speaker: Kevin M. Sowinski, Pharm.D., FCCP
Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Purdue University College of Pharmacy, Adjunct Professor of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana
View Biography
Kevin M. Sowinski, Pharm.D., FCCP
Sowinski

Learning Objectives
1. Describe differences between descriptive and inferential statistics.
2. Identify different types of data (nominal, ordinal, continuous [ratio and interval]) to determine an appropriate type of statistical test (parametric vs. nonparametric).
3. Describe strengths and limitations of different types of measures of central tendency (mean, median, and mode) and data spread (standard deviation, standard error of the mean, range, and interquartile range).
4. Describe the concepts of normal distribution and the associated parameters that describe the distribution.
5. State the types of decision errors that can occur when using statistical tests and the conditions under which they can occur.
6. Describe hypothesis testing, and state the meaning of and distinguish between p-values and confi¬dence intervals.
7. Describe areas of misuse or misrepresentation that are associated with various statistical methods.
8. Select appropriate statistical tests on the basis of the sample distribution, data type, and study design.
9. Interpret statistical significance for results from commonly used statistical tests.
10. Describe the similarities and differences between statistical tests, and state how to apply them appropriately.
11. Identify the use of survival analysis and different ways to perform and report it.
Study Designs: Fundamentals, Interpretation, and Research Topics
9:15 AM to 10:30 AM
Academic and Research Building: First and Second Floors, Auditorium

Speakers
Speaker: Kevin M. Sowinski, Pharm.D., FCCP
Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Purdue University College of Pharmacy, Adjunct Professor of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana
View Biography
Kevin M. Sowinski, Pharm.D., FCCP
Sowinski

Learning Objectives
1. Define, compare, and contrast the concepts of internal and external validity, bias, and confound¬ing in clinical study design.
2. Identify potential sources of bias in clinical trials; select strategies to eliminate or control for bias.
3. Outline the hierarchy of evidence generated by various study designs.
4. Compare and contrast the advantages and disad¬vantages of various study designs (e.g., prospective; retrospective; case-control; cohort; cross-sectional; randomized controlled clinical trials; systematic review; meta-analysis). Delineate the difference between parallel and crossover study designs.
5. Select from various biostatistical measures to appropriately compare groups or their assessments from various study designs and use their findings/ output to interpret results.
6. Define and evaluate odds, odds ratio, risk/incidence rate, risk ratio/relative risks (RRs), and other risk estimates. Compute and evaluate number needed to treat and number needed to harm. Define and calculate terms such as point and period preva¬lence, incidence rate, prevalence rate, absolute risk difference, and RR difference.
7. Define and calculate terms such as true positive, false positive, true negative, false negative, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio.
8. Define research and differentiate it from quality improvement activities.
9. Define the composition, functions, and roles of the institutional review board (IRB).
10. Describe the various steps of the professional writ¬ing and peer-review processes.
Break
10:30 AM to 10:40 AM
Geriatrics
10:40 AM to 11:35 AM
Academic and Research Building: First and Second Floors, Auditorium

Speakers
Faculty: Mary M. Bridgeman, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCGP
Clinical Associate Professor, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University; The State University of New Jersey-New Brunswick, New York, New York
View Biography
Mary M. Bridgeman, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCGP
Bridgeman

Learning Objectives
1. Summarize common age-related pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes in older adults.
2. Evaluate the pharmacotherapeutic regimens of older adults to support optimal risk and benefit of medications.
3. Assess inappropriate medication prescribing in older adults using accepted tools.
4. Recommend appropriate pharmacotherapy for patients with dementia.
5. Evaluate the risks and benefits of antipsychotic use in older adults with dementia.
6. Recommend appropriate interventions for patients with BPSD (behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia).
7. Differentiate between the types of urinary incontinence and recommend appropriate treatments.
8. Recommend an appropriate BPH (benign prostatic hypertrophy) treatment, according to the AUASI (American Urological Association Symptom Index).
9. Recommend appropriate analgesic therapy for older adults with osteoarthritis.
10. Discuss the risks and benefits of medication classes used to treat rheumatoid arthritis and associated comorbidities.
Nephrology
11:35 AM to 12:30 PM
Academic and Research Building: First and Second Floors, Auditorium

Speakers
Speaker: John M. Burke, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS
Professor of Pharmacy Practice and Associate Dean for Post-Graduate Education, St. Louis College of Pharmacy, St. Louis, Missouri
View Biography
John M. Burke, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS
Burke

Learning Objectives
1. Categorize acute kidney injury (AKI) as prerenal, intrinsic, or postrenal on the basis of patient history, physical examination, and laboratory values.
2. Identify risk factors for AKI.
3. Formulate preventive strategies to decrease the risk of AKI in specific patient populations.
4. Formulate a therapeutic plan to manage AKI.
5. Identify medications and medication classes asoccisated with acute and chronic kidney damage.
6. Describe characteristics that determine the efficiency of removal of drugs by dialysis.
7. Classify the stage or category of either AKI or chronic kidney disease (CKD) on the basis of patient history, physical examination, and laboratory values.
8. Identify risk factors for the progression of CKD.
9. Formulate strategies to slow the progression of CKD.
10. Assess for the presence of common complications of CKD.
11. Develop a care plan to manage the common complications observed in patients with CKD (e.g., anemia, secondary hyperthyroidism).